Lego tells California police department to stop using Lego heads to conceal suspects’ identities

On the show ‘America Reports,’ radio host and comedian Joe Piscopo captivates Americans with hilarious images that catch their attention.

According to a recent report, the Murrieta Police Department in California has received instructions from Lego to cease the practice of digitally adding Lego heads onto photos of suspects.

According to a statement from Lt. Jeremy Durrant of the Murrieta Police Department, the Lego Group has asked them to refrain from using Lego heads in their social media posts.

In a recent development, the Lego Group reached out to us and politely requested that we refrain from using their intellectual property in our social media content. We fully understand and respect their concerns, and we will comply with their request. However, we are actively exploring alternative approaches to continue delivering engaging and captivating content to our valued followers.

California Police Department replaces faces of suspects with LEGO heads

The California Police Department has come up with a unique way to protect the identity of suspects. Instead of using traditional blurred or pixelated images, they are now replacing the faces of suspects with LEGO heads. This unconventional approach aims to maintain the privacy of individuals while still providing visual information to the public.

The idea originated from Sergeant Brian Smith, who noticed that blurred or pixelated images often hindered the public’s ability to identify suspects accurately. By using LEGO heads, the police hope to strike a balance between privacy and public safety.

The LEGO heads are carefully selected to match the facial features of the suspects, making them recognizable to those who may have encountered them. This creative solution not only preserves the anonymity of the individuals involved but also allows the public to assist with identifying the suspects.

Since implementing this method, the California Police Department has received positive feedback from the public. The LEGO heads have become a talking point, generating interest and intrigue. It has also been noted that the use of LEGO heads adds a touch of lightheartedness to an otherwise serious matter.

While some may view this approach as unconventional, it serves as a reminder of the importance of striking a balance between privacy and public safety. The California Police Department’s use of LEGO heads as replacements for suspect faces is an innovative solution that demonstrates their commitment to protecting individuals’ identities while still seeking public assistance in criminal investigations.

The Murrieta Police Department in California recently received instructions from Lego to cease the practice of digitally incorporating Lego heads onto photos of suspects. This decision comes after an ongoing practice by the department.

The Murrieta Police Department took to Instagram on Tuesday to clarify their use of Lego head images to conceal the identities of suspects. This practice is in full compliance with state law regulations.

A recent post announced the implementation of a new law in California on January 1st, which imposes restrictions on how and when law enforcement agencies can share suspect photos and mugshots. Assembly Bill 994 and Penal Code 13665 now prohibit the sharing of suspect photos for nonviolent crimes, unless specific circumstances apply. Furthermore, the law mandates the removal of suspect mugshots from social media platforms after 14 days, unless special circumstances exist.

The Murrieta Police Department values transparency with the community while also respecting the rights and protections afforded by law, including those of suspects. To maintain transparency and comply with the new legislation, we have decided to cover the faces of suspects when sharing information about incidents in Murrieta, ensuring their identities are protected.

Assembly Bill 994 and Penal Code 13665 mandate the deletion of suspect mugshots from social media within 14 days, unless there are special circumstances.

The law, known as Assembly Bill 994 and Penal Code 13665, mandates the removal of suspect mugshots from social media platforms within 14 days, unless there are special circumstances. (Fox News)

According to a police spokesperson, the MPD had already begun using Lego faces to conceal the identities of certain criminal suspects even before the law came into effect on January 1st.

We have been taking steps to ensure that our residents stay informed about public safety events in our community while also complying with the new regulations. As part of this effort, we have been obscuring the faces of suspects in our social media posts using different methods. This has been a practice we have been following for the past few years, so it is not something new to us.

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